Who is this for?

This regional level fair is open to home school students from Kindergarten to 12th grade.


What are the type of projects that can be entered?

Before detailing what a project is, it is important to know what is it not.  A science fair project is not a
research paper or a book report with visual aids or a presentation of facts that have been
accumulated.  
Instead, it is a project that is based on a scientific principle that is researched in detail, then
something is built or an experiment is performed in order to demonstrate this principle.  What was
done and learned is then communicated at the fair with an exhibit that consists of a display of work
done, a board, and for 5th grade and up a report and journal.  The final aspect of a science fair
project is an interview by judges.

Most fairs require that all types of projects be based on an experiment.  
We are different.  We do not.  
We want students to get excited about learning and diving deeper into science, so we offer the
ability to choose a type of project that does not require an experiment to be performed, but it must
be based on a scientific concept that is then communicated by what is built.

The project areas are:

1.   
COLLECTION – A collection of science related items, which are scientifically categorized and
labeled accurately.  (ie. rocks, butterflies)

2.   
MODEL / DEMONSTRATION – Non-experimental project that represents what something is
realistically like (model) or demonstrates a scientific principle by showing how something works with
action (demo).  Must relate to science.  (ie. an ear, a rocket, working heart model, working volcano)

3.   
EXPERIMENT – Follows the scientific method while answering a question using a hypothesis as
the basis for the experiment.  It must have a control and multiple items/subjects being tested varying
only one factor at a time.  Keep in mind, for proper analysis of results, generally the experiment is
either repeated multiple times or a large group of items are being tested at the same time.  
Performing an experiment one time and/or with a few items does not yield enough data to determine
if your hypothesis is proved or disproved.

a.   PHYSICAL – An experiment related to/with non-living things.

b.   BIOLOGICAL – An experiment related to/with living things.


What are the parts of the exhibit?

An exhibit will consist of:

1.   
BOARD - (Typically one is bought to use.)
Overviews the project in text, pictures, diagrams, graphs, etc.

2.   
DISPLAY -
Is the collection, model, items being used for the demonstration, or used for the experiment.

3.   
JOURNAL -
A handwritten daily or weekly log in a bound notebook that details research & what was done.

4.   
REPORT -
The sections needed are listed in the rules.  (8th grade and up need to type their report.)

5.   
ABSTRACT -
A 1-page overview of the project, included in report.  (Applicable to high school group only.)

NOTE: The Journal & Report are done by 5th grade & up, and 4th graders who opt to on the
registration form.


What are the grade groups?

Each year our age groups vary due to how many students register and what grades are
represented.  Generally exhibitors are divided into 5 grade groups.  
(i.e. K-2nd 3rd-4th, 5th-6th, 7th-8th, 9th-12th)


How are the exhibits judged?

Each age group is assigned a team of three judges.  Our judges are dads and many have been
judging the fair for five to ten years.  Each exhibitor is first judged on their efforts evaluated on a
100 point basis or 115 point basis, based on their grade level.  Teams are judged respectively on a
175 point and a 205 point system, based on their grade level.  )The point system is outlined in the
registration packet.)  Once all exhibitors in a grade group have been judged, then the judges
determine five specialty places to receive additional recognition and awards.  
See the next question for what those are.


What are the awards available?

There are great rewards available for your efforts.  Everyone exhibiting will be featured in our
program and receive a certificate, participant ribbon, and be recognized for their efforts with a blue,
red, or white ribbon, as well as receive a
gift bag.  
There are also five specialty ribbons awarded in each grade division.  The exhibitor earning the top
highest score is recognized as the Grand Champion, while the second highest score receives the
Reserve Grand Champion.  Since 2002, we award each Grand Champion with a
$100 savings bond, a
medallion, and a science gift while our Reserve Champions receive a
$50 savings bond along with a
medallion, and a science gift.  The remaining three specialty ribbons are Best Interview, Best
Display, and Most Original.  

There are also door prizes given away throughout the day to exhibitors!

Keep in mind none of this is possible without our sponsors.  In 2008, God miraculously provided the
exact amount needed for bonds through individuals!!
In 2009 and 2010, one of our sponsors, Innovative Science Solutions, bestowed the Science Quest
Award.  The high school exhibitor that showed the best research based project received a certificate
and a cash award!  We are always looking for sponsors who want to provide additional awards.  

If that is you, please go to our Sponsors tab to be a part of this effort & to be a blessing & to be
blessed by giving!
 
2011 Group 1
Model
Insects
Ladybugs!
Blue Ribbon
Check Back for 2018
Science Fair Dates!!
 
2011 Group 2
Model
Suspension
Bridges
B is for Bridges
Blue Ribbon
2018 Online Registration - OPEN in January 2018
Adobe Reader is required to open documents.  Free Adobe Reader
 
ANNOUNCEMENT BOARD:







THANK YOU TO THE EXHIBITORS, FAMILIES, JUDGES, & VOLUNTEERS
THAT WERE A VITAL PART OF OUR 20TH ANNIVERSARY IN 2016!!
HOPING FOR ANOTHER 2O, BUT THAT WON'T HAPPEN WITHOUT YOU!!!

Sponsors and Donations always needed!!
Visit our Sponsor page on details about our sponsors and how you can donate or be a sponsor!!
 
2011 Group 3
Dinosaurs
Dino Database
Red Ribbon
 
Experiment
Lie Detectors
I Cannot Tell A Lie
Blue Ribbon
 
Model
Anatomy
The Human Eye
Blue Ribbon
Documents vital to the success of your project are available below to download.  
RULES
RULES
Project Timeline
Project Timeline
Guide for Projects
Guide 4 Projects
Judging Criteria
READ 1st - Classify your Project
Judging Criteria
TRSF is a division of BACHEN (Bay Area Christian Home Educators Network),
a recognized 501(c)(3) non-profit organization.
Classification